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Faculty Spotlight

Mr. Shelton Makes Science Fun

My favorite part of Mr. Shelton’s class is the interactive learning. We never know what we are going to be doing. He always has fun demonstrations that connect what we are learning to the real world. Mr. Shelton’s teaching is one-on-one, making sure everyone is on track. He is energetic and engaging with the students!
                                                                                                                                       – Madi '22

Combine skill and fun, add a healthy dose of humility, sprinkle in a couple of catchphrases, and you’ve got the recipe for Mr. Shelton's science class. 

If you happened to be walking in Rodney Academic Building this week, you might find Mr. Shelton’s Physics students racing battery-powered cars down the hallway. On a sunny day, you will catch him outside with his AP Environmental Science students discussing ecosystems by the stream. With a background in environmental engineering, Mr. Shelton has always loved teaching, and describes himself as a “teacher who pretended to be an engineer for a while”. He came to Oldfields specifically to teach physics, but has taught a variety of science classes over the past two years. From Earth Science to Introduction to Physical Science, he has embraced each course here--taking the material seriously and having a whole lot of fun along the way. 

An event that Mr. Shelton introduced Oldfields to is the Central Maryland’s Physics Olympics (CMPO) held each February at Liberty High School in Carroll County. This event has been happening for over 30 years and is run by Mr. Shelton's physics mentor. Mr. Shelton has volunteered at CMPO over the years and has even brought his daughter Molly along to enjoy the fun. This past spring he registered a group of Oldfields students to participate in the competition. An event that attracts dozens of schools across the state, it features unusual materials and unique challenges. Fun and creative, Mr. Shelton says this event shows students that “physics is back, and it's fun again.” Regardless of being a strong Physics student, the Olympics is an exciting, competitive event open to all students. 

Mr. Shelton believes in second chances, offering his students the opportunity to redo work and learn from it. He teaches his students that mistakes are inevitable but come opportunities to make something even better. He admits to still discovering much he does not know,  sharing “Half of physics is something you already know. The other half of physics is surprising.” Our students are not the only community members who are impacted greatly by Mr. Shelton. Faculty and staff members appreciate him for his humility, energy, and the closet of random objects that he has in his classroom. Do you need a handful of cotton balls? A sheet of plywood? A massive cardboard tube? How about a rocket-launching apparatus? Just ask Mr. Shelton.